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Communication – Messaging

How to test your communications

This is a resource to help you test your messages. It is designed for campaigners who have little or no experience with message testing.

Photograph of a billboard advertising Winfield cigarettes. The billboard advertising reads 'Anyhow... Winfield 25s'. Graffiti has been inserted so it reads 'Anyhow buga up a Winfield 25'.

BUGA-UP

Formed in 1979, Billboard Utilising Graffitists Against Unhealthy Promotions (BUGA-UP) made its mark on hoardings around the nation. By revising advertising slogans and disrupting tobacco-sponsored events, the group revealed the true cost of tobacco and alcohol company deception.

Photograph of hands holding cups with lit candles against the dark sky.

After Florida – can America change its gun laws?

The massacre at Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida is similar to many that have happened at schools across the USA. But there is a hope here in Florida that feels different to previous tragedies, because of the powerful political analysis and leadership coming from students.

A group of people gather under a tree with clipboards.

Is personalized political communication manipulative?

“Personalized political communication” refers to when the medium for a message is a person, not media such as television, pamphlets, or billboards. The electoral arms race is seeing a renaissance of PPC and greater engagement of voters in campaigns and the political process.

Large crowd gathered in front of the library. In the foreground someone holds up a placard reading 'Let Them Stay'.

How to Talk About Human Rights

Using incredible language data from advocacy, opposition, political speech and popular culture, Anat Shenker-Osorio’s latest research analyses why certain messages resonate where others falter in the human rights sector across Australia, the UK and the US.

Drawing of a pile of coins and a receipt VS a happy person strolling on a path through trees.

How to Talk About Economics: A Guide to Changing the Story

Australian Progress analysed the language people in Australia use to speak about economics (and tax, welfare, aid, privatisation, work and more). These new messaging resources will be useful for communicators, campaigners and advocates for more progressive economic policy.