Format

Case Studies

What does it take for everyday people to shift an election?

The story of how GetUp successfully organised in the seat of Bass to remove sitting MP Andrew Nikolic at the 2016 federal election. Lessons include the power of mixing online and offline; the power of mixing local with national; and have the local lead the national.

Cover of the book 'How Organizations Develop Activists'.

How Organizations Develop Activists A book review

Joel Dignam reviews Hahrie Han’s How Organizations Develop Activists. A key finding of Han’s research is that high-engagement chapters practise both organizing and mobilizing. The Voice for Indi campaign is considered as an Australian example of combining these two approaches.

A number of African American students sit along a lunch counter.

Lessons from the Greensboro Student Sit-ins

The Greensboro student sit-ins had nonviolence at their heart and succeeded, not only in their immediate goal, but also in building a lasting organisation in the SNCC. It stands now as yet another example of the successful use of nonviolence to stand against oppression.

Aerial photograph of huge crowd filling Federation Square and surrounding streets.

Tips for Turnout from Your Rights at Work

The Your Rights at Work campaign ran from 2005 to 2007 and included some of the largest mobilisations in Australian social movement history. This article draws out some of the lessons in relation to ensuring strong turn-out at rallies and other events.

Photograph of inside of Sydney Town Hall filled with people include a large delegation on the stage.

Insights from the Sydney Alliance

What does it take to build a civil society coalition with the power to shift a city? This interview with Amanda Tattersall, Founder and Coalition Director of the Sydney Alliance, gives some good clues.

Image of protesters gathered with flags tied around them

Learning From a Tibet Campaign Win

Kyinzom Dhongdue from Australian Tibet Council shares the story of a campaign win and the lessons that can be taken from it. The country’s oldest university cancelled a talk by the Dalai Lama. Within a week, the University of Sydney backtracked and released a hasty statement welcoming His Holiness on campus in June. The short campaign shows the value of rapid response people power tactics.

Photograph of the first General Assembly of Occupy Melbourne, October 15 2011. A large gathering of people in City Square with signs.

Facilitation at Occupy Melbourne

Insights about facilitation from the very challenging General Assembly process at Occupy Melbourne. This article will be of interest to facilitators and others learning about group process, as well as people keen to find out about the Occupy movement. These reflections were written two weeks after Occupy Melbourne kicked off in October 2011. 

Photograph of the first General Assembly of Occupy Melbourne, October 15 2011. A large gathering of people in City Square with signs.

Occupy Melbourne A Missed Opportunity

“Occupy Melbourne became the largest occupation in Australia, and indeed, the southern hemisphere. Like most truly novel historical events, the Occupy movement caught most people off guard.” This short case study shares some of the lessons from Occupy Melbourne and why more effective skill-sharing would have made a difference.

Three people sit wearing balaclavas.

The radical history of unemployed activism

Insights from the history of unemployed activism. Includes an overview of the history of Australia’s welfare system and stories from the 1920s, 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s – plus creative, humorous and confrontational tactics.

Protestor holding Stop Adani sign on stage with Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk.

Stop Adani and the Suffragettes Reflections on targets and tactics

Joel Dignam analyses two campaign moments: Stop Adani’s targeting of the ALP in the 2018 Queensland state election and the UK women’s suffrage campaign targeting of Liberals in 1905. The lesson? Target those most likely to give you what you want, and sometimes that means creating political risk for them.

Title page of the mobilisation cookbook, featuring the words 'Mobilisation Cookbook: A Greenpeace Guide to cooking up people powered campaigns", over a background of diverse cartoon faces. Below the text is a cartoon of a cooking pot, with a hand sprinkling something granular into it.

The Mobilisation Cookbook

The Mobilisation Cookbook is a guide to answer (almost) everything you wanted to know about “people-powered” campaigns at Greenpeace but were afraid to ask. Developed for Greenpeace staff, volunteers, and allies, this guide will help anyone cook up effective people-powered campaigns.

Over a dozen hands reach into the middle of a circle, making the 'all in' symbol

Grassroots Led Campaigns Report

Decentralised, grassroots-led digital campaigning has taken off in the last decade. This report looks at the impact these campaigns are having, what lessons we can learn from them about success, and what these new campaigns platforms mean for the future of social change.

Over a dozen hands reach into the middle of a circle, making the 'all in' symbol

The Mobilisation Integration Toolkit

An overview of the tools and tactics Greenpeace offices around the world use to ensure their office teams are working seamlessly together. Explore by Country/Region and Trait to find the successful practices or “bright spots” highlighting ongoing experiments in team integration.

Tracey Frauzel, the Mobilisation Strategy Director who gives this course, wears black clothes with a red necklace, and walks down a street with brick walls to one side.

Online Course How to Create ‘People Powered’ Campaigns

Bring People Power into your next campaign or project with MobLab’s online course. Based on the Mobilisation Cookbook, drawing on Greenpeace’s expertise, the free course covers core elements of a ‘people-powered’ campaign, when to use them and what to mix them with. Based on real-life campaign examples, you’ll also cover practical tools needed to create your own campaigns.

A large crowd marching behind a banner saying: We march with Selma!

Building 21st Century Movements

Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman, Founder and former Executive Director of SumofUs, at Progress 2015 with a series of movement case studies challenging us to be technological innovators and to bring our social change work to the cutting edge of the current century.

A brick wall painted white with the words Art = Change! graffitied in black

Films for Social Change

Film can be one of the most powerful mediums for getting ordinary people interested in social change. Australian Progress has put together a crowd-sourced list of films that are about activists, advocates and social movements, or have in of themselves provided impetus for social change.

Screenshot of the Ecomark website. A model in blue sits on a bright pink couch, with flowers on her lap. She is smelling one of them. Overlaid on the image is the text '12956 visitors so far!'

Digital Tactic Inspiration Ecomark by WeMove

Primark, the international clothing chain, famously does not have an online store. So when EU-wide campaigning organisation WeMove chose to target Primark in a sustainability campaign, they started by launching a parody site.

Máté speaks into a microphone at a protest outside the Hungarian Parliament. In the background protestors hold a large poster with Hungarian text.

Home Care in Hungary

In Hungary, digital campaigning organisation aHang has been winning big and building people power in a difficult political environment. Their homecare campaign was a huge win for Hungarian carers, and people power everywhere.

Pin It on Pinterest